The Loud House: A Charming Series About Family

The Loud House: A Charming Series About Family

Blog, Cartoons, Reviews
Chris Savino and Nickelodeon bring cartoon fanatics alike the hit series The Loud House. With modern animated series about crystal gems protecting Earth, magical princess from alternate dimensions, and ladybug-themed superheroes wielding indestructible yo-yos, it’s oddly refreshing to watch a slice-of life animated series with its simple central premise being life in a large family. The Loud House stars Lincoln Loud, an 11-year-old kid and his daily life in being the only boy in a family of 13. Along with his two parents who are typically faceless characters, Lincoln has five older sisters and five younger, being the exact middle child.   The series has been receiving much praise for its heart and old-school charm. Some vocal animation enthusiasts even go as far as to call it Nickelodeon’s trump card and savior. Although these…
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Milo Murphy’s Law: Character Review

Milo Murphy’s Law: Character Review

Blog, Reviews
Milo Murphy's Law is a currently-aired Disney Channel Original series by the modern-day kings of Disney Television Animation: Jeff (Swampy) Marsh and Dan Povenmire—none other than creators of Disney's longest-running series Phineas and Ferb (2007-2015). The story centers Milo Murphy and his two close friends Melissa Chase and Zack Underwood. The trio are subject to the Murphy-family Murphy's Law "disorder", in that in the presence of any male from said family, "anything that can go wrong, will go wrong".   This places the three protagonist in the center of some crazy scenarios, with Milo being the driving force behind them. It is set in the same city as Phineas and Ferb, as the creators have mentioned that the Murphy family only lives a few neighborhoods away from the Flynn-Fletchers. As a long-time Phineas and…
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How Anime Has Impacted American Animation Content – Page 4

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Miraculous Ladybug: Tales of Ladybug & Cat Noir (2015-present) As anime crossed the Pacific into North America, it uncovered the opportunity for viewers to engage in a global community that embraces local cultural differences (Mckevitt 2010); “the case of anime thus serves as one tangible illustration of the impact of cultural globalization on the United States in the last quarter of the twentieth century” (McKevitt, 2010, p. 895). Miraculous Ladybug: Tales of Ladybug and Cat Noir represents an interesting case of hybridization within the global-televised-animation sector. The series is produced through a partnership between French and Korean animation and production companies. Additionally, it has been licensed to air in the United States by Nickelodeon and in other countries, most prominently by Disney (Xandrellium, 2015). Miraculous Ladybug follows two middle school…
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How Anime Has Impacted American Animation Content – Page 3

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Sym-Bionic Titan (2010-2011) As a result of not being categorized as “children’s television”, many anime contain ample violence and bloodshed—to the point where certain titles hold a “mature” rating (Chambers, 2012; McKevitt, 2010). Because these features were unconventional in traditional cartoons during the American “anime boom” in the late 90s, violent scenes of imported content were edited out in order to deem them more child-friendly (Daliot-Bul, 2014, p. 76). However, as the integration of anime onto American television increased, open-mindedness over animation’s capability to capture older audiences followed. As a result, adult-oriented animation such as Family Guy and Futurama materialized and have experienced excellent viewership ratings to justify the production of multiple seasons (Chambers, 2012). Sym-Bionic Titan, similar to Avatar: The Last Airbender, takes plenty of inspiration from Japanese anime;…
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How Anime Has Impacted American Animation Content – Page 2

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Avatar: The Last Airbender (2005-2008) Anime has provided audiences with a glimpse of Japanese life by exposing them to its culture and insights regarding family life, religion, spirituality, and morality (McKevitt, 2010); but rather the presentation of culture solely existing in behavioral cues and beliefs, it is also inherent in anime’s style of art and storytelling. The anime-inspired cartoon, Avatar: The Last Airbender, falls under this spectrum in both its characters and unique premise: An adventurous quest set in an expansive world that draws on an oriental setting, and mythology and storytelling where humans, animals and mystic powers mingle. This show follows the adventures of teenage Aang and his friends who must defeat evil with their special powers, enabling them to bend and manipulate nature’s elements [earth, fire, water, and air] (Daliot-Bul,…
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Anime’s Impact on American Cartoons & Vice Versa

Anime’s Impact on American Cartoons & Vice Versa

Blog, Uncategorized
INTRODUCTION The transcultural flow of media content has increased substantially with the rise of the globalized, followed by digitalized, age (Jin, 2011; Thussu, 2007). Ever since the latter half of the 1900s, there has been an upward trend in the amount of traded media content on a global front; however, this trend is often said to be part of a one-way flow that is dominated by American cultural exportation (Thussu, 2007). Although globalization led to a more open distribution structure, scholars argue that this has only allowed the United States to exert even more dominance over the world’s markets—in this case, over the global cultural sector (Jin, 2011; Thussu, 2007). So rather than offering countries the equal opportunity to participate in global trade, Americanization of cultural content has ensued (Jin,…
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Essay #2: Exploring My Online Image

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Animation Discourse is all about "watching animation critically". Western animation is constantly looked down upon as an inferior form of storytelling compared to its live action counterpart. Although there is no denying that many cartoons are targeted at children, there are plenty of animated works that tell complex and compelling stories that many adults can appreciate as well. As I wrote in my About page: Western animation can be smart, funny, self-reflective, and most significantly, progressive. So why not talk about it in a way that falls into this spectrum? Besides, even if many cartoons are targeted at young people, shouldn’t this motivate us to pay more attention to the media content that plays a huge role in shaping young minds? Animation Discourse was created to take Western animation seriously; especially because it's a form…
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